Highland Hill Farm
Po. Box 517
Fountainville, PA 18923
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Videos On Ornamental Plants and Trees We Grow

Birds can be an important addition to any landscape. Selecting the best ornamental plants that help improve the habitat of your back yard should be chosen for features that provide birds with food and shelter.

Viburnums provide excellent food and shelter for bird habitats.

We fell that viburnums are attractive, versatile, adaptable shrubs for any garden. They can serve as hedges or screens and in mixed perennial and shrub borders. We like them most as specimen plants. They usually in the form of shrubs, but can become small ornamental trees(sieboldi). They range in size from the small Dwarf American Cranberry at 2 feet tall by 2 feet wide, to the Siebold at over 15 feet tall.

Viburnums are plants with year round interest. Viburnums have white to pink flowers in the spring. Some are fragrant. They have large, attractive and often textured leaves. Some viburnums have fragrant flowers that are produced in snowball like clusters in the spring. The flower clusters can be of pink buds, which develop into white flowers. Some fruits are red and turn black with age while others are orange and some blue. Leaves are glossy, dark green and turn a burgundy color in the fall. Midsummer berries are an important food source for birds. Viburnums are a must for the avid birder. Viburnums can have colorful red to purple leaves. Some viburnums can become medium-size trees, especially if they are pruned. Viburnums are specimen plants or can be anchors in mixed borders and hedges and screens. You won't find a better group of shrubs for hedges or for massing in groups, since viburnums are delightful in every season and landscape. Some viburnums, such as Prague viburnum, are evergreen and have fragrant flowers. Others, such as leatherleaf viburnum, are semi-evergreen in colder climates, losing their leaves when temperatures dip below 10 degrees.

We like Viburnums because of their adaptability and durability. While they would prefer full sun and moderately watered, well-drained rich soils, they grow very well in part shade in alkaline, clay soils. Diseases and pests are not common for viburnums. We have more trouble from my kids running over them with brush hogs. They claim they were testing their durability. Yet all the viburnums they chopped to the ground survived. In fact, we sold these plants for a premium as they produced better numbers of desireable stems. Their fibrous root system makes them transplant and propagate easily. (We do have more difficulty with the Korean Spice rooted cuttings.)

If you are shopping for a sharp hardy shrub consider one of the many cultivars of the Viburnum family. In fact select a couple of them. You will be rewarded with shrubs with all season interest.

Viburnums are popular garden plants, known for their white, often fragrant spring flowers and their fall color. The Asian viburnums such as the Carlesi are the most loved. Perhaps the most known viburnums are the Burkwood viburnum (Viburnum x burkwoodii), and the Korean spice viburnum (V. carlesii), both of which fill the air with a wonderful fragrance in mid-spring. (The Mohican is a cross of the two.) Also popular is the doublefile viburnum (V. plicatum f. tomentosum), valued for its layered habit, fall foliage, and clusters of red fruits, and its close relative the Shasta, a gold medal winner. We have most of these viburnums at our 5275 W. Swamp Rd. nursery in Fountainville Pa. ready for customer pickup. Viburnum acerifolium (Maple-leafed viburnum) Although I wouldn't garden without any of these, I like the native viburnums. They may not provide the flower fragrance of their Asian counterparts, but I love them for their fall foliage color and for their fruit displays, which attract birds to my garden in the fall and winter months. In addition, several are useful to waterwise gardeners or in urban conditions. They require only corrective pruning, and none commonly suffer from pests or diseases. These native viburnums are hardy and durable. Once you establish them they will not require a lot of attention and give years of enjoyment.

Viburnums are considered moist woodland plants. In nature they are found along steam banks from Long Island to Florida. When you come to our 5275 West Swamp Rd. location ask us to show some in their native habitat that we found along our stream bank. These plants perform well under normal landscape conditions. I especially like the floral display in the spring and these viburnums that bear fruit in the fall. Winterthur has great red leaves and abundant fruit in the fall. This cultivar needs a cross pollinator such as viburnum nudum.

Native Americans used Viburnum dentatum (arrowwood viburnum) for arrow shafts. The stems are long and strait. This plant will grow in places many plants struggle. So if you have had trouble with plants in a harsh location try this cultivar.

Viburnums

We raise over 10 types of Viburnums on our farms from seedlings to 5' shrubs. We propagate many from cuttings. If you have poor soils due to compacting from construction, try viburnums. Being rugged and hardy, they perform where other plants fail. We have plants from seedlings to 5' shrubs.
American Cranberry Bush
KoreanSpice
Blackhaw
ArrowwoodViburnum
Chicago Luster (we have 500 3-6' that must be sold by Sept 28 2005)
Dawn
Summer Snowflake
Shasta
Winterthur
Blue Muffin
Burkwood
Erie
Tea
Judd
Korean Spice
Praque
Siebold

The food for birds should be available from trees and shrubs in the landscape. Natural food sources are best. Try to copy the native sources that will provide food as is needed by native bird populations. Plants should provide an available food supply all-year-round. Native trees and shrubs native to your area ensures that fruits and berries are available for the local bird population.

Whenever you select a plant for bird habitat improvement try to maintain a balance of 20-25% evergreens. The evergreen can be broadleafed such as holly or in the cedar family such as the eastern red cedars. Multi stemmed plants are best as they will prove better shelter. following these simple tips will increase your birding enjoyment. Judd
Korean Spice
Praque
Siebold

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  • Price List
  • Burning Bushes
  • Evergreen Azaleas
  • Deciduous Azaleas
  • Barberrys
  • Blue Ice Cypress
  • Select one of our ornamental trees
  • Cypress Plants
  • Boxwoods
  • Colorado Blue Spruce
  • Hollies

     Our Ilex Nellie Stevens  Hollies 6-7' Tall

     Our Ilex Nellie Stevens  Hollies 8-9' Tall
  • European Hornbeams
  • Lilacs
  • Rhododendrons
  • Spice bushes
  • Viburnums
  • Daylillies
  • Spireas
  • Horse Chestnut Trees
  • Andromeda
  • Japanese Red Maples
  • Cryptomeria
  • Green Lace Leaf Maples
  • Amur Maple - ginnala Maxim
  • Crape Myrtle
  • Pheasant Sighting
  • An Unusual bird in our lot...
  • One Big Tree at Higland Hill Farm

    My son Michael with our 'Bakeri' Blue Spruce

    This is one of the deepest Blue Spruces we have. This ornamental spruce is 4-5' tall and is a very slow grower.


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    Cedrus Atlantica 'Glauca Pendula' Serpentine

    This is a blue cedar which is a ,like its name, in a serpentine form. A great accent plant that can fit in almost any landscape and will attract attention. For this tree you will need another job. It is priced at $154
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    Arborvitae - Were Ready To Load Your Truck!!!

    Some of the common varieties available at Highland Hill Farm (not all listed):
  • Globe Arborvitae
  • Arborvitae 'Danica'
  • Arborvitae 'Holmstrup'
  • Emerald Green
  • Thuja Orientalis 'Blue Cone'
  • Techny
  • American
  • Excelsa
  • Can Can
  • Giant Western Red Cedar
  • Nigra
  • Wintergreen
  • Elegantissma

  • Green Giant

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    We have thousands of arbs and always have hundreds ready for you to pickup. From 2' to 15' we have inventory balled and burlaped. Don't worry about driving long distances to get to us. We are easy to get to near Phila., on a major road, Rt. 313 in Fountainville Pa.. We want to move our stock and will make sure that you go home a happy camper. If you are coming from a long distance, we will give away free inventory that is surplus to our needs. One of our fields is being converted into ball and soccer fields and work will begin June 1, 2006. Stock in this field will go cheap. We will stay open til the last dog dies or we sell out. I think we have more stock than what we possibly can sell.

    Arborvitae are commonly used evergreen shrubs or trees useful in urban areas where low maintenance and durability is needed. Many cultivars with forms such as being globed in shape, columnar, or narrow pyramidal, tend to be near buildings, doors, and walkways. Other forms which are larger are used for screens and buffers that are planted in rows.
    The form of arborvitae is small, medium, or large depending on the cultivar. Some reach 50', others only 3'. Most prefer full sun to partial sun. Planting in dense shade conditions should be avoided. A moist , well drained, loamy soil in full sunlight are ideal conditions for growing healthy arborvitae. These plants will tolerate rocky, clay, urban conditions of heat drought and pollution. The most important pest we have is bagworms which must be controlled to prevent complete defoliation. Some cultivars have multiple leaders which also prove to be a detraction for the plant. Pruning out multiple leaders in some cultivars is a simple remedy.
    Our most popular Arborvitae is the Emerald Green arborvitae. Many people prefer to spell them Arbor Vitae . It is a bright light green color and narrow in shape. It makes a distinctive and impressive natural fence. It is easy to grow ,plant, and keep in shape.

    The Hetz Midget arborvitae is a dwarf globe variety. This is a good choice for along walkways and gardens. This is a tough plant that is easy to install and not going to cost a lot. It will maintain its color in the winter and will withstand snow loads well. We carry these plants in 2 and 3 gal. pots. The prices on these dwarfs vary from $15 to $30 depending on size and quantity ordered.

    Another small arborvitae that we grow in pots is the Rheingold arborvitae. This is a small globe shaped plant that has a golden green cast to it in the summer and a bronze winter color.
    We also have the American Arborvita known as "Tiny Tim".This arborvita grows in zone 2 - 7. Its is a needled evergreen in the Cupressaceae Family. It will grow in height from a half a foot to 1 foot tall. Its spread will be about 1 to 1.5 feet. This is a plant that requires little work. Selecting quality arborvitae for the home landscape :

    When you get to the nursery or garden center where you will buy your arborvitae, pick out the healthiest, most robust plants that have no evidence of disease or insect damage. The potting medium should be moist, but not wet, and the roots should well dispersed in the medium. Arborvitae that have roots growing from the drainage holes or circling the top of the pot are less desirable. Many people choose to buy arbs from a mail order company, which is perfectly acceptable. However, realize that most woody plants purchased from mail order catalogs will be shipped dormant and bare root, that is, without any soil attached to the root system. Such plants may be smaller in size because of the expense of shipping. It is important to plant such material immediately upon arrival. Generally it is best to purchase one-year-old material from mail order companies since this material is more vigorous and will transplant better. The larger material that is offered is often composed of the less vigorous plants held over from previous years. Most large sized arbs are balled and burlaped. Don't buy any arbs bare rooted over 3' tall. Any plant larger should be balled and burlaped.

  • Planting Instructions for our nursery stock

    Full Sized Varieties Available at Highland Hill Farm

    This is a Nigra Arborvita about 12' high. Its single leader is unchanged by a 14" snowfall. All arborvitae and plants must be sold as we are selling off 150 acres and must clean out the fields before the dozers arrive!


  • These are Emerald Green Arbs, about 3' high. Most of these are a single leader. We have these in quantity up to 6'.

    Plants & Trees at Highland Hill Farm

    These are easy to transplant..We must sell 3000 of these arborvitae as some of our fields have been sold


    These Emerald Greens are 3-4' and starting to fill out well. These plants transplant easily. Arbs have masses of small fibrous roots which allows them to transplant at most times of the year. The Emerald Green has the best year round color, but is narrow in form. In real dry years this plant does not survive as well as the more open arbs such as the American, Techny, Nigra, and Elegantissma. This variety, because its foliage is more dense than other varieties, is less tolerant than more open cultivars. In an urban area with deer problems, this variety will be consumed before the next season. We have in stock and ready to pickup these arbs from seedlings (6-10") to 6-8' trees. We also have some potted 3' Emeralds Ready to go for $30 ea.
    All arborvitae and plants must be sold as we are selling off 150 acres and must clean out the fields before the dozers arrive!


    This is an Elegantissima arborvitae hedge that we have used to buffer the street in front of our home. Note the strength of this plant even with a heavy snow load. The only problem that this hedge has is salt spray from the road. Its a real sound barrier to a busy road which is only 18' from our door. The hedge is 15-18' high and only 4' wide. We have these arbs form 2-3' to 6-8' B&B.
    All arborvitae and plants must be sold as we are selling off 150 acres and must clean out the fields before the dozers arrive!


    This past spring my neighbor noticed that our arbs have produced mini-like pine cone looking nuggets, which are bronze in color, all over its branches. Some of them dried up and fell off, but most remained. He asked me if they could be lacking acid. He insisted that this was not the normal. He could easily see that there is plenty of new growth. He is worrying needlessly. The fruiting bodies are an indication of the plantís maturity. Some are more prolific at producing than others. As long as the plants are maintaining their rich full green color there is nothing to worry about.

    In the past week there has been an increasing interest in landscape design for energy conservation. Rising fuel costs can be offset by landscaping. The primary goal is to control wind and sun. In Pa. the first line of defense for energy savings is protection from the cold winter winds by the use of landscaping. Research shows that properly designed screens and buffers can reduce the heating cost of a typical residence by as much as 30 percent. Arborvitae can work to also help cut your heating costs by using them for a wind screen. Arborvitae For Winter Fuel Saving There have been studies that show that wind speeds around homes can be reduced by as much as 90%. The best design for windbreaks depends on the use and exact location of the site. However, in most of Pa. the prevailing winds are from the northeast, thus, the maximum protection should be concentrated in the north east. A single row of conifers with staggered spacings is the best for protection from both wind and blowing snow. The wind is deflected up and over the screen, creating a well protected zone. The area of maximum protection can extend outward several times the height of the trees. If space is at a premium, fewer plants will be helpful, but the use of conifers and other densely branched species is essential for maximum winter protection.arborvitae make an excellent choice for providing winter protection. Arborvitae are commonly used evergreens useful in urban areas where low maintenance and durability is needed. Many cultivars with forms such as being globed in shape, columnar, or narrow pyramidal, tend to be near buildings, doors, and walkways. Other forms which are larger are used for screens and buffers that are planted in rows. The form of arborvitae is small, medium, or large depending on the cultivar. Some reach 50', others only 3'. Even small Arborvitae can help breakup the wind and drifting snows of winter. Most prefer full sun to partial sun. Planting in dense shade conditions should be avoided. A moist, well drained, loamy soil in full sunlight are ideal conditions for growing healthy arborvitae. These plants will tolerate rocky, clay, urban conditions of heat drought and pollution. The most important pest we have is bagworms which must be controlled to prevent complete defoliation. Some cultivars have multiple leaders which also prove to be a detraction for the plant. Pruning out multiple leaders in some cultivars is a simple remedy. The ease in planting and maintaining this plant make it an ideal choice for planting around the house. Plant shrubs with wind direction in mind. Since south winds are generally warmer than northeast winds, it is considered sufficient to have moderate protection on the east and desirable to leave the south open or restricted to rows of shrubs and deciduous trees. More openness to the south allows solar gain in the winter and for summer ventilation house. The economic incentive of reduced heating costs is additional to known benefits of reduced snow clearing. While most homes have at least some naturally treed areas or planted screens protecting their yard, the full potential benefit from tree planting is far from being realized. Energy conservation is a growing concern. Current studies confirm what fuel oil dealers have known all along, homes with screens and buffers use considerably less fuel. The time to begin planning for an energy conscious future is now.

    The Green Giant Arborvita

    The hardiness zone for the green giant arborvita is from zones 5 to 8. It is an evergreen with rapid growth rates that in ideal conditions can be up to 3 feet per year. Site requirements for the green giant is sun to partial shade, moist well drained soil but does well in clay, and needs protection from wind . Its texture is fine with its form conical being narrow to broadly pyramidal, reaching from 50 to 80' in height to 15 to 20 feet in width. The leaf is rich, green,with graceful foliage. It keeps its foliage color in the winter. the green giants flowers/fruit are .5" erect female cones. The green giant has strong wood, casts dense shade,and has cinnamon red bark when young. This arborvita does not tolerate salt spray. This arborvita should outlive even your children.

    Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana)

    An evergreen shrub or tree in the Cypress Family (Cupressaceae)

    My first real adventure with Eastern Red Cedar happened on the farm I grew up on. It was located south of Lambertville N.J. on the Delaware River. Our farm was located on a mountainside and it had been clear cut more than 75 years before. Cedars were like pioneer invaders, Cedars would take over in areas were there were clear-cuts, abandoned fields, places where topsoil had been scraped off and generally were other plants had a tough time becoming established.It didn't mind clay or rocks and here the Cedars found a home. Over the years, other trees took hold and the cedars continued to grow. After many years, the oaks nearby began to tower over the Cedars and the Cedars began to decline. One Cedar caught my eye one day while hunting. I had heard that Cedars were valuable for wood to make cedar chests, closet linings, cedar shavings, and fence posts. I knew the lumber was selling for a over a dollar a board foot. Forty years ago that was a lot on money to a farm boy and I couldn't let that get away. I figured that this tree had to be 25 feet up without a branch, and was almost 3 feet at the base. Now you can do the math, this was something I had to do. I went to the barn and got the chain saw and went up to the cedar and began to cut it down. It didn't take long and I realized that it was hollow. So I figured I would continue. Maybe the tree would be solid up a few feet and my money tree would be. With a big crash the giant was slayed. I proceed to cut up the top of the tree and to my surprise it was a bee tree. A colony of honey bees had made its home inside this tree. So now I began plan B. I decided to join the 4-H and this colony of bees became my first beehive. So now whenever I see a large Cedar Tree I think of my money tree.


    Cedars serve as wind breaks, and are good trees to help with erosion control. Red Cedars are really in the Juniper Family and are related to Arborvitae and False Cypress, and are representative of the many landscape Junipers. Most full grown Cedars you find will be from 30-35 feet tall and with diameter of 15 feet. The best examples of full grown cedars are usually found in cemeteries. Here they are in the open and the grounds are maintained around them, they grow to exhibit their full form and development. Red Cedars are a rugged plant. Cedars can tolerate fertile, sterile, rocky, sandy, clay, dry, or moist but well drained places. This plant likes to be neglected and will grow under harsh conditions including smog, reflected light and intense heat in urban locations.
    The only pests that I really worry about are bagworms.CHECK YOUR ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS FOR BAGWORMS. These can defoliate your nursery stock. June is time to start looking. It's time to inspect junipers, arborvitae and pines .... even broadleaf shrubs and trees like rose, sycamore, willow, beech, maple, elm and black locust.

    The bagworm gets its name from its spindle-shaped bag that the caterpillar carries around as it feeds on your plants.

    The bag is woven from silk and is covered with bits and pieces of leaves and twigs from the your plant. The bag of a worm feeding on juniper will not look the same as the bag of a worm feeding on willow. Ultimate size will be slightly over one inch and hang down on the plant.

    The larva itself is dark brown with a yellow head and yellow and black spots on the body. You will have a tough time opening up the bag to see it. Adult females are wingless and lack usable legs, eyes and antennae. They are almost maggot-like, and seldom seen. Adult males are typical moths, black and densely hairy. Wings are nearly clear with a span of about an inch. I have never seen one in our nurseries only in pictures. The problem with bagworms is that they defoliate them. Heavy populations kill will an ornamental arborvitae and juniper. But control is possible.

    The larvae hatch from overwintering eggs in the spring usually in May. Each larvae spins a silken bag that it carries about while it feeds on the plants foliage. As it enlarges, the larva enlarges the bag as it keeps adding bits of foliage as camouflage. Many people don't know that the bag is there because it looks like a seed pod on shrub or tree.

    Because the larval stage is the only mobile stage, one bush can have a high population and another one several feet away can be free of bagworms. Several parasites feed on bagworms. Birds eat them and the worms can be killed by low winter temperatures.

    A very effective control is to pick the bags off the host plant in the winter.

    Young bagworms are especially sensitive to the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. This is commercially available under the trade name Dipel.

    The disease caused by the bacterium affects only the moth larvae and is very safe to use. Always read and follow label directions before treatment. Best results will be obtained when spraying in late afternoon or early evening.

    Treat early when you first notice the bagworms, since small larvae are easier to kill. Other insecticides which will control bagworms include acephate (Orthene) and carbaryl (Sevin). There are some mites, midges and beetles that can be problematic. Rusts, make the tree unsightly don't harm this tree but can effect other plants such as pines and apple trees. If you are looking for a hardy, native evergreen, for a construction or landscape site that needs little care, this is your tree. We have plenty of seedlings and B&B trees up to 6' ready for your pickup. Its best to call in advance if you want more than 10 as we will dig them fresh for you.

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